enzh-CNzh-TWja
Login

Register

Member Login

A recent USA Today/Rock the Vote survey of millennials shows 80 percent of millennials support transitioning to “mostly clean” or renewable energy by 2030.

Although their hearts may be in the right place, few millennials appear to realize how much energy their lifestyles actually consume, where this energy comes from and how much it would cost to transition to a nation that’s powered predominantly by renewables by 2030.

As a millennial myself, I’m quite familiar with this phenomenon. Many of my peers don’t understand electricity doesn’t just come from the wall; email isn’t necessarily green because it isn’t printed on paper; and a lifestyle that revolves around binge-watching Netflix has a real effect on the environment.

Charleston, WV (August 6, 2015) – West Virginia Manufacturers Association (WVMA) President Rebecca McPhail-Randolph echoed Governor Earl Ray Tomblin's sentiment that the EPA's proposed regulations as announced earlier this week are still unreasonable, unrealistic, and ultimately unattainable for the state.  

"This regulation will be exceptionally difficult, if not impossible for many manufacturers to meet and will increase in energy prices while decreasing electric reliability," McPhail-Randolph said. "Building more efficient power plants, factories, cars and appliances is something our manufactures already strive to do, all of which are leading to lower emissions. At a time when our country needs policies that promote innovation and encourage economic investment that allows our manufacturers to remain competitive, the EPA's proposed regulation appears punitive.

The WVMA will continue to support our state and the manufacturing industry as we fight this rule, and will work with the administration toward a West Virginia-specific plan to keep the Mountain State compliant."

An editorial from The Journal MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- Environmental regulators in West Virginia must walk two fine lines. One is between air, water and soil quality and the economy. The other, of course, is between what they think is good for the Mountain State and what the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency demands. Public hearings on a variety of revisions to environmental . . .

bpchairCharleston, W.Va. – Bob Pepper, Senior Vice President of Manufacturing at NGK Spark Plugs (U.S.A.), Inc., presided over his first meeting as the newly elected chair of the West Virginia Manufacturers Association (WVMA) Board of Directors last week. Pepper, a 35-year veteran in automotive parts manufacturing, has been with NGK since 2007, and previously served as director of Manufacturing Administration. He is responsible for all North American manufacturing and OEM/OES distribution, with locations in Irvine, Calif., and Sissonville, W.Va. His experience includes roles with Chrysler, Textron Automotive and Webasto Roof Systems, as well as NGK.

“Manufacturing is on the rise in West Virginia,” said Pepper. “I am pleased to serve as chair of the WVMA as we work toward addressing issues that are critical to industry growth including workforce and education issues, as well as state policy issues that affect manufacturers.”